North Dakota Beef Council
North Dakota Beef Council

Beef. Setting the Record Straight

 

America’s beef producers have launched their second set of nutrition advertising comparing the nutritional benefits of lean beef and skinless chicken. The ads use government data to illustrate lean beef compares favorably to skinless chicken breast in terms of fat, yet provides greater amounts of some essential nutrients.

According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) database that lists the nutrient compositions for all foods, six of beef’s leanest cuts have, on average, just one more gram of saturated fat but eight times more vitamin B12, six times more zinc and three times more iron than chicken’s leanest cut: the skinless chicken breast.

Beef Ad The series of four ads begin appearing in the January issues of 23 consumer-interest magazines, such as Cooking Light, Prevention, Men’s Health, Sports Illustrated and Family Circle.

The ads compare a 3-ounce cooked serving of skinless chicken breast to the average of 3-ounce cooked servings of six widely-available cuts of lean beef: eye round roast, top round steak, top sirloin steak, boneless shoulder pot roast, round tip roast and shoulder steak. In addition to these cuts, there are at least seven more beef cuts that meet government requirements for lean or extra lean, including some of America’s favorites, such as tenderloin, T-bone steak and 95 percent lean ground beef.

 

 

Get The Skinny on Beef

2 Charts: Six Lean Cuts of Beef as Compared to a Skinless Chicken Breast / Other Lean Cuts of Beef as Compared to a Skinless Chicken ThighThere are at least 29 cuts of beef that meet the government labeling guidelines for lean or extra lean.


According to government guidelines, a serving qualifies as "extra lean" if it has less than 5g total fat, 2g or less saturated fat and less than 95mg cholesterol per 3.5 oz. serving. A serving qualifies as "lean" if it has less than 10g total fat, 4.5g or less saturated fat and less than 95mg cholesterol per 3.5 oz. serving. In addition to the cuts listed on the chart below, 95% lean/5% fat ground beef is also considered lean. Find out how beef compares to chicken for nutrients and fat content .

Learn more about the types of fat found in beef and chicken.

 

 

North Dakota Beef Council